Try again. Fail again. Fail better.
Install Theme

On Poisoned Apples, the "Great YA Debate," and the Death of the Patriarchy →

anneursu:

It matters, that boys read about girls, that they engage closely with books that speak to what it is to be a girl today. It matters that they understand how it feels to be catcalled, to be touched in a way you don’t want to be touched. And that they understand how it feels to wake up every morning desperate to be skinnier, having that desire consume you like fire. How it feels to get by on 1000 calories a day, 500, 100. How it feels to schedule your whole day around exercise, or around eating meals and then throwing them up. It matters that they engage deeply with the forces in society that might cause a girl to feel this way. This is a human issue.

It matters, greatly, that we all engage with literature that treats girls like people, so perhaps we can we actually can celebrate some small crumbling of the patriarchy some day, so more boys are equipped to take on the rampant misogyny in the world, so that everyone understand a feminist critique of, say, video games, isn’t designed to threaten anybody, but to better us all.

It matters greatly that YA literature exists, that books like Poisoned Apples exist, that girls and boys and even some enlightened grown-ups read them.  

 Then, maybe, we can all be better adults.

A long read, but certainly worth it. 

This is the greatness of rereading when you’re many years older: You are a different person. And so I’m shocked and thrilled to read the Bartleby that I read this week. When I was a kid I couldn’t get past the mysteriousness. This time I thought, at first, Bartleby is the lawyer’s story; but in time I realized it’s about the dynamic between Bartleby and the lawyer. The lawyer is not deceiving himself, but he only knows partially what he does, and what he thinks, and how he thinks; Melville brilliantly shows you the degree to which the lawyer understands what he’s thinking about and the degree to which he doesn’t. The lawyer is the essence of the Upper West Side liberal. [Laughter.]

What is Bartleby? He’s not real, none of them are real—they’re postures, they’re attitudes, ways of being in the world. All the lawyer wants is for Bartleby to be reasonable. This is the essence of what Bartleby cannot be. Bartleby is that which is not reasonable. Now, I say to you, if the lawyer was a radical, not a liberal, he would have gone the extra mile. He would have kept Bartleby no matter what. He would have known that Bartleby is the essence of rebellion, of the refusenik, of “I won’t live on your terms,” of “in fact I’m not even sure if I want to live on any terms.”

Looking forward to more excellent programming from Qubit.

Looking forward to more excellent programming from Qubit.

art recs | Chelsea & Downtown

Harun Farocki @ Greene Naftali

Marcel Dzama @ David Zwirner

Tomma Abts @ David Zwirner

Lily van der Stokker @ Koenig & Clinton

Fin de Sicle @ Swiss Institute 

Orly Genger and James Siena @ Sargent’s Daughters

publicartfund:

Current We The People artist Danh Vo and his practice. 

blouinartinfo:

Uncovering Danh Vo’s Revelatory Practice Read it here…

via Electric Objects - Artist zine pages

Getting back to your question: the politics of such a map is as old as mapping itself but with some new particularities. Maps have always been representations of space produced by entities with financial or political power. These representations become problematic when they take on the air of objective truth through use and habit. A common example is how strange it is to look at a south-up map. So the map or territory issue here is pretty well staked out. 

What aggravates the problem in this era is automated symbolic manipulation by algorithmic entities. In other words, the apparatus producing the map is automated to such a degree that it becomes easier to believe it is truthful. It is harder to spot the biases and easier for us to imagine that algorithms deal with the data objectively. So the work of understanding the gap between the map and the territory becomes the work of understanding the biases in the algorithms, the sensors, and the mechanics of the map-making apparatus as a whole. 

via The Future of Mapping: An Interview with Clement Valla | ART21 Magazine

Getting back to your question: the politics of such a map is as old as mapping itself but with some new particularities. Maps have always been representations of space produced by entities with financial or political power. These representations become problematic when they take on the air of objective truth through use and habit. A common example is how strange it is to look at a south-up map. So the map or territory issue here is pretty well staked out.

What aggravates the problem in this era is automated symbolic manipulation by algorithmic entities. In other words, the apparatus producing the map is automated to such a degree that it becomes easier to believe it is truthful. It is harder to spot the biases and easier for us to imagine that algorithms deal with the data objectively. So the work of understanding the gap between the map and the territory becomes the work of understanding the biases in the algorithms, the sensors, and the mechanics of the map-making apparatus as a whole.

via The Future of Mapping: An Interview with Clement Valla | ART21 Magazine

Brian Eno | Running In Circles

To praise over 40 years of the maestro’s influence, this edition of Orbital Mash is a three hour special on Eno’s collaborations since then. His solo work will be presented in a third edition of the Running in Circles series.

via Clocktower Radio

lisafrankfurtschool:

This is how one pictures the unicorn of history. Its face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, it sees one single catastrophe which keeps piling wreckage upon wreckage and hurls it in front of its hooves. The unicorn would like to stay, awaken the dead, and make whole what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing from Paradise; it has got caught in its wings with such violence that the unicorn can no longer close them. The storm irresistibly propels it into the future to which its back is turned, while the pile of debris before it grows skyward. This storm is what we call progress.

This is basically what the inside of my brain looks like.

lisafrankfurtschool:

This is how one pictures the unicorn of history. Its face is turned toward the past. Where we perceive a chain of events, it sees one single catastrophe which keeps piling wreckage upon wreckage and hurls it in front of its hooves. The unicorn would like to stay, awaken the dead, and make whole what has been smashed. But a storm is blowing from Paradise; it has got caught in its wings with such violence that the unicorn can no longer close them. The storm irresistibly propels it into the future to which its back is turned, while the pile of debris before it grows skyward. This storm is what we call progress.

This is basically what the inside of my brain looks like.

anneboyer:

boosthouse:

anne boyer's “how a revolution” from her chapbook my common heart

Once, some years ago, after staring at a screen, I wrote this. 

anneboyer:

boosthouse:

anne boyer's “how a revolution” from her chapbook my common heart

Once, some years ago, after staring at a screen, I wrote this. 

Brooklyn-based artist Amy Brener is all about excavating the technological artifact in her large, translucent, crystal-like sculptures. Each standing the height of an average-sized human, the totems are like some colossal peer of Thaddeus Wolfe’s ongoing Assemblage Series. Into these cast resin and concrete monoliths, Brener fossilizes decade-old Nokia phones, Fresnel lenses, and gypsum; once the cast dries, she chisels away, cracking sheets of plastic and remnants of our recent technological past, revealing sculptures that resemble the natural and the geological. The structures stand bright and vertical, weighted in a mix of familiar earthy rock formations and distant ideas of the supernatural. As Brener notes, “My pieces are artifacts from an imagined future.”
via Amy Brener, artist – Sight Unseen

Brooklyn-based artist Amy Brener is all about excavating the technological artifact in her large, translucent, crystal-like sculptures. Each standing the height of an average-sized human, the totems are like some colossal peer of Thaddeus Wolfe’s ongoing Assemblage Series. Into these cast resin and concrete monoliths, Brener fossilizes decade-old Nokia phones, Fresnel lenses, and gypsum; once the cast dries, she chisels away, cracking sheets of plastic and remnants of our recent technological past, revealing sculptures that resemble the natural and the geological. The structures stand bright and vertical, weighted in a mix of familiar earthy rock formations and distant ideas of the supernatural. As Brener notes, “My pieces are artifacts from an imagined future.”

via Amy Brener, artist – Sight Unseen

Hot & Cold: Revolution in the Present Tense, is a series of performances, urban interventions and artist-led workshops that will consider how creative commentary on the 1989 Revolution in Romania informs current discussions about democracy, social participation and urban identity. This project will take place in Timişoara and Cluj in December 2014, a period of commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the Revolution that instigated the end of Communism in the country.

Support this exhibition on Tilt!

Pure print-on-demand by artists who work on, within and around the internet. 176 pages. 

Fall 2014 contributors: Constant Dullaart, Daniel Temkin, James Bridle, John Zissovici, Cheryl Sourkes, Brian Droitcour, Tan Lin, Angela Genusa, Webdriver Torso, Rafaël Rozendaal, Olia Lialina and Cory Arcangel. 

Published by Paul Soulellis. Launching at Printed Matter’s NY Art Book Fair at MoMA PS1 (September 26–28, 2014). #1 and #2 will be for sale at the fair (table N46). 

via Printed Web No. 2

Pure print-on-demand by artists who work on, within and around the internet. 176 pages.

Fall 2014 contributors: Constant Dullaart, Daniel Temkin, James Bridle, John Zissovici, Cheryl Sourkes, Brian Droitcour, Tan Lin, Angela Genusa, Webdriver Torso, Rafaël Rozendaal, Olia Lialina and Cory Arcangel.

Published by Paul Soulellis. Launching at Printed Matter’s NY Art Book Fair at MoMA PS1 (September 26–28, 2014). #1 and #2 will be for sale at the fair (table N46).

via Printed Web No. 2

genevieve belleveau’s “S&M Interventions in Art Institution Gardens pt 3.”

(Source: instagram.com)